The Most Dangerous Islands in the World

Nine threatening islands where you wouldn’t be!

Most of the islands you will see in this gallery have seemingly everything to be among the most beautiful islands in the world. Looking more closely, no one would set foot in these dangerous islands. Why ? These are the most dangerous islands on Earth. There are poisonous snakes, hungry crocodiles, irradiated ground etc in these islands. Each of these islands has something that makes it nightmarish for holidays in the sun.

Ilha da Queimada, Brazil

Ilha da Queimada, Brazil
The Ilha da Queimada, nicknamed “Snake Island” lies off the coast of Brazil and it is home to thousands of vipers Spearheading Doree. These snakes are the most venomous in the world, and there are, according to local legend, about five of these bugs crawling on each square meter of the island. For years, the only human inhabitant was a lighthouse keeper, but now the Brazilian Navy prohibits any civilian to enter the island.

Miyake-jima, Japan
Miyake-jima, Japan
Located in the archipelago off Izu Tokyo, Japan, the most important feature of Miyake-jima is its active volcano, Mount Oyama, which erupted on several occasions in recent decades. Since the most recent eruption, in 2005, leaking toxic fumes of the volcano and visitors have been required to wear gas masks at all times. Sirens are activated across the island when the sulfur levels increase sharply.

Saba, Netherlands Antilles

Saba, Netherlands Antilles
According to the Caribbean Hurricane Network, the small island of Saba was hit by the heaviest hurricanes over the past 150 years. Moreover all the other islands in the region include five Category 3 hurricanes and seven category 5 hurricanes. You should go to this island only in winter.

Bikini Atoll, Marshall Islands

Bikini Atoll, Marshall Islands
This UNESCO World Heritage site is dangerous for two reasons: nuclear radiation and sharks. It was the scene of more than 20 nuclear tests between 1946 and 1958, and although the islands were declared “safe” in 1997, the inhabitants refused to return, and eating locally grown products is not recommended in this place. In addition, the lack of fishing in the region during the past 65 years has prospered marine life including sharks, which, with the many wrecks in the area, attracts hundreds of divers each year.

North Sentinel Island, Andaman Islands (Indian Ocean)

North Sentinel Island, Andaman Islands
This small island population of about two hundred people, called “the Sentinels”, is famous for hosting the loneliest people in the world. Any attempt to contact with the outside ends in gunfire with stones and arrows. In 2006, two fishermen found themselves in the maritime area of the North Sentinel island, consequently they were killed by archers.

Gruinard Island, Scotland

Gruinard Island, Scotland
This small island in the north of Scotland was used by the British government for biological weapons testing during the Second World War. Experiments were conducted on the uninhabited island by the Bacterium Bacillus Anthracis, highly virulent, which killed hundreds of sheep and forced the authorities to quarantine the island. The island was decontaminated in the 1980s, using hundreds of tons of formaldehyde, another potentially dangerous material.

Farallon Islands, USA

Farallon Islands, USA
Between 1946 and 1970, the waters around the Farallon Islands off the coast of San Francisco served as radioactive waste dumping site. An estimated 48,000 low-level radioactive waste drums covered the island, but their exact location and their threat to the environment remain uncertain. There is also a large population of elephant seals, which attract dozens of great white sharks. In March 2015, the wreckage of the aircraft carrier USS Independence was rediscovered in the region; measurements made near the wreckage showed no nuclear contamination despite loading waste drums during his voluntary sinking in 1951.

Ramree Island, Burma

Ramree Island, Burma
This island off the coast of Burma is famous for a terrible incident that took place during World War II. In 1945, following battle¬†between British and Japanese troops, some 400 Japanese soldiers have been forced to flee in the marshes surrounding the island where they were apparently attacked by a large population of saltwater crocodiles. The incident, according to the Guinness Book of Records, “the greatest disaster suffered (by humans) by animals.”

Thilafushi Island, Maldives

It is nicknamed “the island trash”. Indeed, the island nation of the Maldives can’t bury its waste in huge dumps like the rest of us did. Faced with a lot of waste and few options, the Maldives decided to start throwing them into an uninhabited lagoon. Needless to come with her towel and swimsuit here, there is no room to spread out on the beach.